The World in 2100

The world is expected to add another billion people within the next 15 years, bringing the total global population from 7.3 billion in mid-2015 to 8.5 billion in 2030, 9.7 billion in 2050, and 11.2 billion by 2100, according to new estimates from the UN.

Currently, 60 percent of the global population lives in Asia, 16 percent in Africa, 10 percent in Europe, 9 percent in Latin America and the Caribbean, and only 5 percent in North America and Oceania. China and India are the largest countries in the world, together making up almost 40 percent of the world population.

The world population is growing at a gradually slower and slower pace, but it’s still growing substantially. Currently, the world adds about 83 million people per year, equivalent to roughly the population of Germany. But population growth has slowed to 1.18 percent per year from 1.24 percent a decade ago.

The UN expects population growth to continue to gradually level off. Global population is almost sure to rise in the short term but the UN says there is a 1 in 4 chance that the world population will stabilize or fall before 2100.

Some scientists suggest that the Earth can sustain 2 billion to 3 billion people at a good standard of living over the long term, but the current population of 6.5 billion — expected to rise to 8 billion — will leave an ever greater “footprint” on the planet.

In the short term, climate change may be a more important subject for intelligence officials than for military planners.

Analysts at the National Intelligence Council are trying to develop a set of early warning signs that could suggest where the next famine might arise or which countries are in most danger of being destabilized as a result of dramatic climate changes. Intelligence officials put those countries on a “stability watch list.”

It is expected that oil, and natural gas will become obsolete in 2100, we will have to move towards a renewable recourses if we want to continue on this planet.