Response 1: September 15th

September 15th: Ice, water, climate change, and beyond

Hi All, I am excited about where this class is going and what everyone is bringing to the discussion. I look forward to reading your posts and sharing our perspectives, information and ideas for the world.

James Balog’s photographs did shock me.  I have taken geology courses and ten years ago it seemed that the geological clock moved by tens of thousands of years but now it seems to be moving from year to year.  James is capturing the past, present and the lack of future that is ahead of us if we don’t make some changes.  When he pulled out the memory card of his camera and said “this is the memory of the landscape and that landscape is now gone,” I felt that I now really understood the impact.  As a photographer I feel the power in that memory card and if it is lost or deleted, that’s it gone forever just like the glaciers. Now with my travels, I prioritize based on a book I spotted a few years back called 100 Places to go Before They Disappear.

Also, Iceland has been a major discussion in the news in terms of glaciers, landmass, and volcanic activity.  We have seen the global impact from Iceland’s volcanic activity.  I hope that people will not think in the present annoyances of flights getting canceled or rerouted but more in the long-term global impact.

Photo: a friend of mine lives in Alaska and this was her adventure last weekend, I thought it was very fitting for our latest discussion.

“The first time I visited the Exit Glacier at the Kenai Fjords was in June 2014 right after moving to Alaska. I was in awe, getting so close to the Exit Glacier (the one Obama went to in seward) is humbling, but it is also sad in a way. The road leading to the glacier has year markers stating where the glacier was in the road by year. In the 1890s, the glacier was massive, leading past the part entry. The amount that it has receded since 1900 is a wake up call that we should all heed. I love the glaciers, their beautiful and massive, and a reminder of how important nature is, how harsh nature can be, and how small we are in the world but the large impact we have on the earth.

I have been to the Exit glacier multiple times in the past 2 years, and I went to the glacier near Valdez after I went to Canada.

Being in the big city of Toronto and seeing some of the pollution that I have been absent from since living in Alaska made me realize how lucky I am to live in AK with the opportunity to walk to a glacier. Von and I are so much more environmentally conscious since moving here because we see the water drip from the glacier as we look at it, and we know, we are part of the problem but we can be part of the solution as well.

When you see a glacier, your mind sort of explodes!” – Alisa

Worthington Glacier, 9/7/2015

Alisa was here
Valdez, AK_2015

Worthington Glacier 9/7/2015

Camera
iPhone 6
Focal Length
4.15mm
Aperture
f/2.2
Exposure
1/2326s
ISO
32

Worthington Glacier 9/7/2015

Camera
iPhone 6
Focal Length
4.15mm
Aperture
f/2.2
Exposure
1/2326s
ISO
32

IMG_4755

 

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