Category Archives: Ice

$65

Every once in a while something happens where I have little to no sympathy.   Good thing the New York Times article (below) chose not to include a comments section. There is a part of me that has a difficult time understanding how safeguards to protect investments in critical research (and money!) were not put in place.   But then again, there was yet another oopsie-level event at the NSA so anything

Regardless, I couldn’t help but read the article and empathize with the loss of  samples collected under the most extreme of conditions.

 Martin Sharp, the director of the Canadian Ice Core Archive, examining an ice core. A freezer storing part of the archive failed this month. Ice from the Canadian Arctic has completely melted, leaving puddles of water in its place and scientists devastated. O.K., this is what actually happened: Ice cores, millennia-old ice samples extracted by scientists from locations across the Canadian Arctic, melted because of a freezer malfunction in a lab at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. The loss of these ice cores could hinder scientific research into how changes in the atmosphere have shaped Earth’s climate history, and how they could affect its future. On April 2, the temperature of a storage freezer in the Canadian Ice Core Archive rose to about 100 degrees — some part of the cooling system failed, “then tried to get itself back into action and in the process, piped hot air back into the room,” according to Martin Sharp, the director of the archive. The freezer became so hot that it tripped the fire alarm, Dr. Sharp said, and partially or fully melted 180 ice cores collected by government scientists since the mid-1970s from the snowy expanse of the Canadian Arctic.
Martin Sharp, the director of the Canadian Ice Core Archive, examining an ice core. A freezer storing part of the archive failed this month. Ice from the Canadian Arctic has completely melted, leaving puddles of water in its place and scientists devastated. O.K., this is what actually happened: Ice cores, millennia-old ice samples extracted by scientists from locations across the Canadian Arctic, melted because of a freezer malfunction in a lab at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. The loss of these ice cores could hinder scientific research into how changes in the atmosphere have shaped Earth’s climate history, and how they could affect its future. On April 2, the temperature of a storage freezer in the Canadian Ice Core Archive rose to about 100 degrees — some part of the cooling system failed, “then tried to get itself back into action and in the process, piped hot air back into the room,” according to Martin Sharp, the director of the archive. The freezer became so hot that it tripped the fire alarm, Dr. Sharp said, and partially or fully melted 180 ice cores collected by government scientists since the mid-1970s from the snowy expanse of the Canadian Arctic.”
Here is a $65 solution from Amazon, with free shipping! A redundant system of even five of these in place would have probably still cost less than the research grade Fisher solution below:
Here’s a laboratory grade solution (if you have something really important to be concerned about):
Fisher Scientific research-level temperature alarm system
But if you want to save money, have a tech or two on hand, or access to an engineering school, or the creative and committed minds at NYU’s ITP, you could build your own monitor using off the shelf, easily accessible parts to send alerts to cell phones or land lines:
DIY microntroller projects to send alert by cellphone at predefined temperature settings.

Inspirational Videos

These are two videos that have inspired how I want my final project to look. I love how the first video is edited. It helps tell the story, and this can only happen through video. People are used to watching dance on a stage, but this new form is becoming increasingly popular. This story is unique in the way that the video aids the plot of the dance. Also video lives forever, and because of that this dance will continue to shared for a very long time.

This video is another new way to view dance. Although I would love to go to the Arctic and film the dance there, that is near impossible. So I can not accomplish what this video does with using the environment as part of the dance, but I hope to have the environment sill present in my choreography.

Final Technical Update

So far so good!

I have finalized many aspects of my project. I have found a day that works for all of the dancers, and the videographer. I have also booked a room so we are set to record on Saturday. I have just finished a “storyboard” of how I want to edit the film, and what shots I will need at certain parts of the dance. The only problem at the moment is finding the long piece of cloth for the dance, the cost is proving quite tricky. I am trying to figure out a less expensive idea that will still convey what I originally envisioned, however time is of the essence. I think that I could also do the dance without it, but the cloth will add an another level of story telling. I talked with every dancer about the topic of the dance before I asked them to be in it, and every dancer had a very unique reaction to the phrases “climate change” and “melting of the ice caps”. I loved seeing their personal connection to the topic, and because of that I am going to rework the dance allowing the dancers a bit of improve time so they can bring their feelings to the piece.

After I get the footage I will edit the entire film as well as find some stills of the dance. Since I am filming Saturday and already know how I want to edit hopefully I will be able to get it done by Sunday night so I will have Monday to share it with people and get their reaction to the piece, which scares me a little.

Finally, I need to figure out how I want to arrange my presentation. I will most likely use powerpoint because it is what I am most used to. I am debating between if I want to present the research first and then the dance or the dance and then the research, and then maybe the dance again. I want my dance to be able to speak for itself.

I am excited to see the dancers preform this piece!

Midterm!

As I have done more research on my original proposed topic, air pollution, I discovered it was not where my heart lies. Last semester I studied abroad in London. In one of my classes we learned about how when it rains in Venice the streets flood because the water level is so high. Then, when I traveled to Amsterdam for a weekend trip I noticed that pretty much all of the grass was submerged in water. The water levels are rising each day, and it is something that you have to look for now, but as time goes on it will be more noticeable.The National Geographic states,

“Since satellites began regularly measuring Arctic sea ice in 1979, it has declined sharply in extent and thickness. Much of the ice that’s there in winter is thin stuff that doesn’t survive the summer. The loss of ice is affecting the entire Arctic ecosystem, from plankton to polar bears. And some scientists think that, by altering the jet stream, it’s affecting weather—and people—around the Northern Hemisphere.”

I want to change my topic to the melting of the ice caps. I knew I wanted to direct it in a way that deals with water and global warming, but it wasn’t until we watched the documentary of the ice caps melting that I knew that was the story I wanted to tell through dance. So for my project, I will be telling a story of the melting ice caps through dance. This will be a group dance, with about 6 people. I will be using the song Tornado by Jonsi. I have yet to reach out to ask about using the song, I will be doing that within the next few days. This dance will include a blue piece of fabric that will be used by all of the dancers. I want to examine the facts for and against these ice caps melting, and with that tell a story of an ice cap slowly melting, with one person who is refusing to see what is right in front of their eyes. I have pulled some videos for examples of the kind of piece I would like to create.

 

Is World War III Going to be About Water?

It was a casual Thursday night that me and my three best friends decided to go out and get a few drinks to unwind from a very long week. Once we settled down  at the restaraunt and got to talking, one of my friends, Sarah, started talking about her political science classes. The topic quickly shifted to her theory that World War III is going to be about water. Now, given the circumstance, we all thought she was being absurd so our reaction was to laugh it off; there was no way that there was any truth to this.

After our last lecture in Green World, in which we looked at the environmental issues surrounding clean water, I’m starting to wonder if my friend Sarah was right all along. While the theory seems absurd, all the facts that support it are horrifyingly that: facts. Fact: The earth if made up of 70% water, but only 2.5% of that water is clean, and even worse, only 1% is easily accessible. Fact: the rivers in poorer cities and towns barely move due to the insurmountable litter that is thrown into them. Fact: Melting ice is flowing down moulins at a speed faster than ever, decreasing sea ice at both Poles and affecting the global energy balance. In short, water is becoming a commodity. And what, in the past, have nations done to secure commodities? They fight.

I lived in Dhaka, Bangladesh for about 6 months in my junior year of high school and I remember doing a science project in which we put seeds into the lake and those same seeds in fresh water to see which batch would grow quicker. After a month, we noticed that the seeds in the lake had not grown at all due to the extreme pH levels of the water. Being an eye witness to something so grave really affected the way I saw the situation. I wasn’t just reading about it from the comfort of my own classroom. I was seeing it with my own eyes. Poorer countries are at an even greater disadvantage because they have not organized proper filtering, recycling or garbage systems and so pollution is at all time high. As the amount of drinkable water dwindles, I fear that is the developing countries that are going to suffer the most.

 (This image is free to use or share and is linked back to its original source)

While it is important to recognize that World War III could very well end up being about water: it is also important to recognize that war is not our only option. The solutions are clear and they are simple. Solution: developed nations can rally together to help developing nations create proper disposable systems to decrease pollution. Solution: developed nations can start using renewable energy sources more commonly to avoid dirtying large bodies of water with oil and nuclear waste. Solution: we need to all stop pretending that someone else will come up with the solution for us because before we know it, what seemed like a silly conversation between four college friends will become a horrifying reality.

Change The World, One Scoop At A Time

Save Our Swirled (S.O.S.) Climate Justice Now!
Save Our Swirled (S.O.S.) Climate Justice Now!

There is no denying that I love ice cream, but I also love companies that use their power of voice for good. Ben & Jerry’s is an ice cream corporation that has been dedicated to our world since the beginning. They are bringing facts to the public in a quick and easy to read format.

“5 Things That Will Happen If We Burn All the Fossil Fuels”

  1. Antarctica will melt
  2. Sea levels will rise 200 feet
  3. No more orange juice
  4. We could easily sail around both poles
  5. No more mansions in the Hamptons

Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield are two friends who co-founded this company in Burlington, Vermont. They are activists and are creatively engaging with the climate change movement through art in the form of ice cream. The video below reminds me of James Balog‘s photographs of the glaciers and the power of an image combined with facts. For many, glaciers are distant and hard to appreciate unless they have seen them personally. Ice cream; however, is something that almost everyone is familiar with and can understand. This video is kid friendly and has a message for all ages.

Ben & Jerry’s ice cream has fans around the world and they are constantly inventing and creating new flavors. With the ability to bring in new flavors at anytime, they are able to start a conversation with their consumers and the greater public. One of the latest inventions is called “Save Our Swirled” also known as “S.O.S.” Besides being a Raspberry ice cream with marshmallow and swirls of dark and white fudge, it also has an important message…”if it is melted, it’s ruined!”

Ben & Jerry's, Save Our Swirled (S.O.S.)
Ben & Jerry’s, Save Our Swirled (S.O.S.)

They care about the planet and are active in finding a solution to climate change. Many employees were at the Climate March last year. Ben & Jerry’s uses simple but powerful words to educate the world on the issues that are plaguing our planet today. They have an audience and are using their voice to create awareness and change. Below is their idea of four basic solutions for helping slowdown climate change.

The four basic “quick fix” points to solve climate change:

  1. Divest from fossil fuels
  2. Increase renewable energy sources
  3. Put a price on carbon pollution
  4. Work with developing countries to invest in renewable energy

Ben & Jerry’s is also know for their truck tours around the United States, bringing free scoops to fans of their ice cream. Now they have teamed up with Tesla, Elon Musk’s invention, and are using that it as their environmentally friendly car.

Ben & Jerry's teaming up with Tesla
Ben & Jerry’s teaming up with Tesla

Different environmental organizations have teamed up with Ben & Jerry’s in their movement. “Protect Our Winters Wants to Freeze Climate Change in Its Tracks” Avaaz, “one of the world’s most powerful online activist group”, has partnered with Ben & Jerry’s Climate Justice plan. They are seeking people to sign the Avaaz petition as the world prepares for the December 2015, Paris Climate Summit. Ben & Jerry’s have been mobilizing their employees and fans to be active in contacting their political leaders. They idea is that the more of the public who stands up and voices their love for our planet Earth, the more our political leaders will do something about climate change.

PEACE LOVE AND ICE CREAM 

…Died & Buried. Fossil Fuel made of Sweet Cream Ice Cream with Chocolate Cookie Pieces, Fudge Dinosaurs & a Fudge Swirl. 2005-2010.

Flavor Graveyard, Fossil Fuel
Flavor Graveyard, Fossil Fuel

It’s Big! – It’s Beautiful! – It’s A Frigidaire

PA_Frig_Freezer AD
Frigidaire 1940s Advertisement

Throughout the past few months, I have become more aware of the importance of preserving our water and being thoughtful with our natural resources.

Cooling, freezing, and ice. How are refrigerators and freezers used? Is there a better form of cooling and storage? The Frigidaire Company brought a “self-contained” unit into the homes of the people in 1923. Since then, we have created a society that wants and needs to purchase in large quantities. Due to our work and personal life balance, we are unable to go to the markets or store every other day for fresh ingredients. Our freezers give us the ability to preserve food for a longer period of time than in the past. Please note that I am referring mainly to the United States when it comes to our grocery shopping patterns and use of storage for our food.

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This weekend, I was in Pittsburgh where I explored a famous fish market called Wholey. The market was broken up into a few sections. In the middle, it was the frozen packaged fish ready to be taken home while on the sides was the fresh fish on ice. In the back was the aquarium like tanks with live fish, lobsters, and clams. I was overwhelmed with the variety of seafood and eager to try all of the samples that I could find. However, my tourist mode came to a stop when I saw a sign saying how much ice is used everyday to keep the fish fresh and ready to sell. Now I love fish, I love fish markets, and I appreciate having it accessible to me, but I wonder at what costs.

Chasing_ice_james_balog_bill_hatcher_p
Photographer James Balog

I instantly thought about the work James Balog is doing around the world. He is creating awareness to the glacial devistation occuring due to global climate change. I wonder how he feels about the use of ice in this format. Is there a better way to keep food fresh? Can we reuse the water that melts off from the ice?

Combustion of available fossil fuel resources sufficient to eliminate the Antarctic Ice Sheet

Combustion of available fossil fuel resources sufficient to eliminate the Antarctic Ice Sheet      Ricarda Winkelmann, Anders Levermann, Andy Ridgwell, and Ken Caldeira

Abstract

“The Antarctic Ice Sheet stores water equivalent to 58 m in global sea-level rise. We show in simulations using the Parallel Ice Sheet Model that burning the currently attainable fossil fuel resources is sufficient to eliminate the ice sheet. With cumulative fossil fuel emissions of 10,000 gigatons of carbon (GtC), Antarctica is projected to become almost ice-free with an average contribution to sea-level rise exceeding 3 m per century during the first millennium. Consistent with recent observations and simulations, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet becomes unstable with 600 to 800 GtC of additional carbon emissions. Beyond this additional carbon release, the destabilization of ice basins in both West and East Antarctica results in a threshold increase in global sea level. Unabated carbon emissions thus threaten the Antarctic Ice Sheet in its entirety with associated sea-level rise that far exceeds that of all other possible sources.”  — Science Advances (AAAS)

Response 1: September 15th

September 15th: Ice, water, climate change, and beyond

Hi All, I am excited about where this class is going and what everyone is bringing to the discussion. I look forward to reading your posts and sharing our perspectives, information and ideas for the world.

James Balog’s photographs did shock me.  I have taken geology courses and ten years ago it seemed that the geological clock moved by tens of thousands of years but now it seems to be moving from year to year.  James is capturing the past, present and the lack of future that is ahead of us if we don’t make some changes.  When he pulled out the memory card of his camera and said “this is the memory of the landscape and that landscape is now gone,” I felt that I now really understood the impact.  As a photographer I feel the power in that memory card and if it is lost or deleted, that’s it gone forever just like the glaciers. Now with my travels, I prioritize based on a book I spotted a few years back called 100 Places to go Before They Disappear.

Also, Iceland has been a major discussion in the news in terms of glaciers, landmass, and volcanic activity.  We have seen the global impact from Iceland’s volcanic activity.  I hope that people will not think in the present annoyances of flights getting canceled or rerouted but more in the long-term global impact.

Photo: a friend of mine lives in Alaska and this was her adventure last weekend, I thought it was very fitting for our latest discussion.

“The first time I visited the Exit Glacier at the Kenai Fjords was in June 2014 right after moving to Alaska. I was in awe, getting so close to the Exit Glacier (the one Obama went to in seward) is humbling, but it is also sad in a way. The road leading to the glacier has year markers stating where the glacier was in the road by year. In the 1890s, the glacier was massive, leading past the part entry. The amount that it has receded since 1900 is a wake up call that we should all heed. I love the glaciers, their beautiful and massive, and a reminder of how important nature is, how harsh nature can be, and how small we are in the world but the large impact we have on the earth.

I have been to the Exit glacier multiple times in the past 2 years, and I went to the glacier near Valdez after I went to Canada.

Being in the big city of Toronto and seeing some of the pollution that I have been absent from since living in Alaska made me realize how lucky I am to live in AK with the opportunity to walk to a glacier. Von and I are so much more environmentally conscious since moving here because we see the water drip from the glacier as we look at it, and we know, we are part of the problem but we can be part of the solution as well.

When you see a glacier, your mind sort of explodes!” – Alisa

Worthington Glacier, 9/7/2015

Alisa was here
Valdez, AK_2015

Worthington Glacier 9/7/2015

Camera
iPhone 6
Focal Length
4.15mm
Aperture
f/2.2
Exposure
1/2326s
ISO
32

Worthington Glacier 9/7/2015

Camera
iPhone 6
Focal Length
4.15mm
Aperture
f/2.2
Exposure
1/2326s
ISO
32

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